Sound Sense the Wellness Blog

presented by Dorinne Davis


Now in ebook “Sound Bodies through Sound Therapy”

Sound Bodies through Sound Therapy discusses whether a sound-based therapy would be appropriate, and offers the correct sequence to set the proper foundation if a therapeutic protocol is needed. its presentation of the various sound-based therapies of today, is strongly supported by scientific information and is pulled together by the author’s concept “The Tree of Sound Enhancement Therapy”.  The final chapter shares the testimonials documenting the challenges and successes of various cases.  

Don Campbell offered that the book “educates us in the essential role of the ear, speech and movement, inspires us with new potentials of sound and music in therapy, and delights us with a wealth of references.”

While first published in 2004, the book still has remained the only book to pull together the importance of a multi-therapy approach to ensure the best outcome with the use of specific sound-based therapy.  Use the ebook as a reference whenever needed.

http://www.amazon.com/Sound-Bodies-through-Therapy-ebook/dp/B00F56CX3G/ref=sr_1_2_title_0_main?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1382391999&sr=1-2&keywords=dorinne+davis


Sound Therapy and the Needs of the Autism Community

The ideas within this blog were first presented as Comments for Autism Spectrum News “The Promise of Research” in 2008 and have been updated limitedly.  Have things changed that much? You Decide. 

 

Sound-based therapy, as a field, is at its inception stage.  Therefore, the promise of research is exciting for this field.  Sound therapy is often thought of as a ‘hearing’ response but it entails much more than that.  Sound therapy uses the energy of the body.  For any person with a disability, whether it be autism or another disability, the possibility of repatterning ‘their sound energy’ is quite exciting.  The concepts of sound-based therapy revolve around 5 laws connecting the voice, the ear, and the brain and the fact that the cells of the body emit and receive vibrational sound frequencies. This philosophy is now called The Davis Model of Sound Intervention™.  There are a number of sound-based therapies that incorporate these factors and make change for each individual.  The key is determining where the person is utilizing sound inappropriately and support the body to make natural self change.  A diagnostic test battery has been designed for this purpose called the Diagnostic Evaluation for Therapy Protocol (DETP®).  Research can help determine how the vibrational energy of sound can impact each individual, both with the particular therapies and the test battery.  To date, limited research has been done with a few of the various therapies but not on the concept of sound’s impact on the body, especially with sound-based therapy.  This must be done in the near future.

 

For the autistic population, the research is especially important because each case of autism is unique.  For example, why do some children appear to react negatively to vaccinations?  The process is very involved but can be understood better if the body was looked at as an energy emitting/receiving source.  The “Frequency Equivalent™” of the vaccination may be one that is not positively received by the body’s frequencies and therefore the body reacts negatively.  If the body as a whole was evaluated by frequency, issues associated with the many different challenges associated with ‘autism’ and other wellness responses could be identified, and this information could then be used separately with sound-based therapy or in conjunction with other medical practitioner’s therapies.  This idea has been implemented with a few autistic children with good success but needs to be further defined with research.  The sound-based therapy associated with sound frequency holds great potential for identifying root cause wellness issues.

 

Another example would be for the autistic child with developmental and learning challenges.  Are they hearing sound too sensitively? Are they unable to process incoming sound (not hearing) stimulation appropriately?  Are there vestibular challenges?  Does the child lose contact easily with the world around them?  These issues are all related to how we process ‘sound’ between the voice, the ear, and the brain.  Although the five laws are known, further research needs to be done to demonstrate how important these 5 laws are to a child’s development.  Although the body’s response is inherent in each person, distortions in perception of sound can alter how one develops language, uses language for communication, socially connects with others, uses balance/coordination skills, pays attention and stays focused, and so much more.  Research incorporating the autistic child’s response to sound utilizing the voice, ear, and brain hopefully will lead to treatment options that can be used in educational practices.  And the research should not just stop with 3 of the 5 laws.  For total change, all five laws should be included in the research.

 

With the increased numbers of autistic children in the United States, it is imperative that all possibilities for diagnosis and therapy be explored, including alternative approaches.  Both the ‘why it happened’ and the ‘what can make foundational change’ need to be explored.  Sound-based therapy with appropriate diagnostic testing is an important option moving forward.  With sound-based therapy, it is often not the particular method that makes the change.  More importantly is making sure the right method(s) are used as demonstrated by the vibrational energy needs of the person. This is only discovered with sound response testing—not hearing testing, not sensory testing, not vestibular testing or other typical standardized testing. This is a new paradigm for how we can best meet the needs of people on the autism spectrum but one that should be considered moving forward.

 

So I encourage people today—five years later—to again consider Sound-based therapy as an alternative approach for making foundational energetic rebalancing.  The approach definitely has potential to change lives associated with any diagnosis title.  If interested in exploring opportunities with the Davis Model of Sound Intervention™ (including funding research) reach out to Ms. Davis at info@thedaviscenter.com

 

©Davis2013

 


Why Sound Processing is not necessarily Auditory Processing?

Once a friend told me that it takes approximately 30 years before a mindset change will occur. I won’t have 30 more years to see my work be accepted so I am trying to either write my thoughts through blogs, articles or books, and/or talk about them on my radio show, webinars or presentations.  One of the repeated discussions or questions that comes up has to do with the terminology used.  Today’s discussion is the difference between ‘sound’ and ‘auditory’ processing.  Are these words interchangeable?—perhaps to many as they understand the term ‘auditory’ with today’s mindset.

 

What does ‘auditory’ imply?  To me, ‘auditory’ implies the sense of hearing because the sense is triggered through the cochlea within the inner ear.  ‘Sound’ does not need an ear for the body to process it.  Many dictionaries define sound as vibrations traveling through various mediums that can be picked up by the ear.  Thirty years ago when I was asked to teach ‘sound’ to a physics class, I also used that type of definition.  In fact when the age old question of ‘If a tree falls in the forest and no one is there to hear it, is there a sound?’ was asked, I said at that time, that if no one was there and there was no ear to pick up the sound, then there was no sound.  However, I no longer would teach that. 

 

Today my answer would be a resounding ‘yes’ that  a sound is made, because I no longer ‘consider ‘sound to be an auditory function only.  I prefer to think of sound as waveform energy set in motion by vibrating objects. With this understanding, we must ask ‘What vibrates, thereby producing a sound?” What is around us or within us that vibrates? Research has determined that all cells vibrate creating their own sound and that everything vibrates including inanimate objects.  Accepting that, then it is time to realize that sound is everywhere because everything is vibrating.

 

So what is the difference between sound processing and auditory processing?  Auditory processing only implies a function of processing sound within the frequencies of hearing perceived by the cochlea in the inner ear or along the pathway to the auditory centers in the brain.  Sound processing implies the brain interpreting and responding to any cellular, even quantum movement within the body.  So sound processing is a brain function, not an auditory function.

 

Sound is also externally around the body if everything vibrates.  How does this affect our cellular vibrations and what the brain processes?  The field studying this phenomenon is still in its infancy.  This is part of what I do as a part of the Davis Model of Sound Intervention®.  My work utilizes specific sound-based therapies to change how the body functions by supporting a repatterning of the body’s sound energy for self-healing purposes—reconnecting the body towards its natural form and function.

 

The Davis Model of Sound Intervention® incorporates the use of vibrational sound patterns through specific sound-based therapies to make change.  The use of sound in specific patterns, pitches, intensities, and types of music are what is important, not any one specific therapy. The flow chart to determine the best methods is The Tree of Sound Enhancement Therapy®.  Both sound processing and auditory processing are important separate portions of that chart.  Only through the Diagnostic Evaluation for Therapy Protocol (DETP®) is it possible to determine if one or both of these issues are present.  Currently there is no other evaluation available to determine if sound processing is a challenge to the person.  One cannot assume that auditory processing challenges indicate sound processing challenges and vice versa.  A standardized auditory processing test does not always identify a sound processing issue.  Over the next few years, I anticipate having a screening tool for determining if sound processing issues are present.

 

I encourage those interested in auditory processing and sound processing challenges to begin observing what skills, behaviors, body responses and more are present with those individuals and keep track of them.  Please share them with me if you wish as data collection will be important to the growth of this newly evolving field—sound-based therapy.

 

 

 

 

©Davis2013


Sound Processing is Not Sensory Responsiveness; It’s Mind/Body Responsiveness

When people hear the word ‘sound’, they assume that the ear is using the sense of hearing.  However, the brain is actually our sound conductor and works diligently to ensure that body’s response to sound is in balance, has the best rhythm, maintains the proper duration of sound, supports the best inflection, and keeps the entire body in tune.  The brain understands the cellular rhythmical patterns and knows when those patterns, or our body’s sound song patterns are in harmony with the body’s everyday functioning.  The brain and body work together to harmonize or balance how the body responds to what is taking place inside of it as well as to what is happening outside or around it.  The way we respond to sound works in a cycle of balancing the frequencies.

The brain turns the cellular frequency or vibrational codes that it processes into meaningful functional responses.  The input from the senses, whether they are hearing, sight, touch, smell, or taste, are only additional codes that the brain receives and processes.  All frequency codes should be considered as ‘sound’. These codes produce chords, overtones and/or harmonics of the sounds. The brain processes these sound frequency codes and their subsets in order to produce the body’s response.  The brain supports the body to maintain a level of body coherence or balance. So sound processing is more a mind/body response than a sensory response. Sound-based therapy supports balancing this responsiveness, especially as evidenced within the Voice-Ear-Brain Connection.