Sound Sense the Wellness Blog

presented by Dorinne Davis


Sound Therapy and the Needs of the Autism Community

The ideas within this blog were first presented as Comments for Autism Spectrum News “The Promise of Research” in 2008 and have been updated limitedly.  Have things changed that much? You Decide. 

 

Sound-based therapy, as a field, is at its inception stage.  Therefore, the promise of research is exciting for this field.  Sound therapy is often thought of as a ‘hearing’ response but it entails much more than that.  Sound therapy uses the energy of the body.  For any person with a disability, whether it be autism or another disability, the possibility of repatterning ‘their sound energy’ is quite exciting.  The concepts of sound-based therapy revolve around 5 laws connecting the voice, the ear, and the brain and the fact that the cells of the body emit and receive vibrational sound frequencies. This philosophy is now called The Davis Model of Sound Intervention™.  There are a number of sound-based therapies that incorporate these factors and make change for each individual.  The key is determining where the person is utilizing sound inappropriately and support the body to make natural self change.  A diagnostic test battery has been designed for this purpose called the Diagnostic Evaluation for Therapy Protocol (DETP®).  Research can help determine how the vibrational energy of sound can impact each individual, both with the particular therapies and the test battery.  To date, limited research has been done with a few of the various therapies but not on the concept of sound’s impact on the body, especially with sound-based therapy.  This must be done in the near future.

 

For the autistic population, the research is especially important because each case of autism is unique.  For example, why do some children appear to react negatively to vaccinations?  The process is very involved but can be understood better if the body was looked at as an energy emitting/receiving source.  The “Frequency Equivalent™” of the vaccination may be one that is not positively received by the body’s frequencies and therefore the body reacts negatively.  If the body as a whole was evaluated by frequency, issues associated with the many different challenges associated with ‘autism’ and other wellness responses could be identified, and this information could then be used separately with sound-based therapy or in conjunction with other medical practitioner’s therapies.  This idea has been implemented with a few autistic children with good success but needs to be further defined with research.  The sound-based therapy associated with sound frequency holds great potential for identifying root cause wellness issues.

 

Another example would be for the autistic child with developmental and learning challenges.  Are they hearing sound too sensitively? Are they unable to process incoming sound (not hearing) stimulation appropriately?  Are there vestibular challenges?  Does the child lose contact easily with the world around them?  These issues are all related to how we process ‘sound’ between the voice, the ear, and the brain.  Although the five laws are known, further research needs to be done to demonstrate how important these 5 laws are to a child’s development.  Although the body’s response is inherent in each person, distortions in perception of sound can alter how one develops language, uses language for communication, socially connects with others, uses balance/coordination skills, pays attention and stays focused, and so much more.  Research incorporating the autistic child’s response to sound utilizing the voice, ear, and brain hopefully will lead to treatment options that can be used in educational practices.  And the research should not just stop with 3 of the 5 laws.  For total change, all five laws should be included in the research.

 

With the increased numbers of autistic children in the United States, it is imperative that all possibilities for diagnosis and therapy be explored, including alternative approaches.  Both the ‘why it happened’ and the ‘what can make foundational change’ need to be explored.  Sound-based therapy with appropriate diagnostic testing is an important option moving forward.  With sound-based therapy, it is often not the particular method that makes the change.  More importantly is making sure the right method(s) are used as demonstrated by the vibrational energy needs of the person. This is only discovered with sound response testing—not hearing testing, not sensory testing, not vestibular testing or other typical standardized testing. This is a new paradigm for how we can best meet the needs of people on the autism spectrum but one that should be considered moving forward.

 

So I encourage people today—five years later—to again consider Sound-based therapy as an alternative approach for making foundational energetic rebalancing.  The approach definitely has potential to change lives associated with any diagnosis title.  If interested in exploring opportunities with the Davis Model of Sound Intervention™ (including funding research) reach out to Ms. Davis at info@thedaviscenter.com

 

©Davis2013